Search...

Category Archive:   Reviews


“And the hearty-voiced baritone Joshua Hopkins stole the show as Papageno, the hapless bird-catcher who reluctantly becomes Tamino’s sidekick on his quest. Mr. Hopkins’s antics and pratfalls had the audience giggling all afternoon.” The New York Times, Anthony Tommasini, Dec. 16, 2019. “Stellar performances were delivered by all the players. Joshua Hopkins, baritone, provided a […]

Read More

“Joshua Hopkins sang the enormous role of Athanaël with stunning skill. His character’s bold, even bullying personality was spot on, depicting a monk who is often called too proud in his single-minded pursuit of winning the soul of the courtesan Thaïs. In the end, Athanaël discovers he is in love with Thaïs, and renounces his […]

Read More

“Dans le rôle-titre, le baryton canadien Joshua Hopkins campe habilement un Figaro pieds nus, tatoué, quelque peu voyou. La voix est chaude et solide. L’engagement dramatique est manifeste. La rouerie de cet immense personnage est bien présente.” Brigitte Cormier, Forum Opera, Septembre 29, 2019. “Joshua Hopkins a le baryton sonore requis pour le rôle de […]

Read More

“Baritone Joshua Hopkins absolutely owns the title character, singing the angelic Budd—whom Britten composed almost as a tragic counterpart to Wagner’s Parsifal—with a radiant, full-hearted commitment that continues through Budd’s inevitable fate. The aria in the “Darbies” as the condemned Budd awaits his demise is stunningly rendered by Hopkins, whose interplay with the piccolo riffs […]

Read More

“Baritone soloist Joshua Hopkins took on the roles of the angel Raphael early on and Adam in the final passages; in the delightful aria “Straight Opening Her Fertile Womb,” a humorously drawn description of the emergence of animals on the earth, Hopkins reveled in Haydn’s depiction of various animals—for instance, lingering on the “L” in […]

Read More

“Baritone Joshua Hopkins as Dr. Malatesta was especially robust; his melodies rang with authority and grace. His third act duet with Mr. Glavin (the notorious patter song “Cheti, cheti immantinente,” immediately encored) and first act scene with Ms. Oropesa (“Vado, corro”) were musical highlights, with crisp ensemble work and riveting staging.” Pittsburgh Post-Gazette, Jeremy Reynolds, […]

Read More