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Category Archive:   Reviews


“Joshua Hopkins made a fine debut, singing with a robust baritone as Marta’s ill-fated lover, the violinist Tadeusz.” Chicago Classical Review, Lawrence A. Johnson, February 25, 2015. “As Tadeusz, Marta’s fiancé, Joshua Hopkins used his rich baritone to create a calm, moral center amid the madness of Auschwitz.”  Chicago Sun-Times, Wynne Delacoma, February 25, 2015. […]

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“Vocally, the Count and Countess Almaviva…stole the show. Hopkins’ baritone is strong, beautiful, and confident. He sings with musicality, bringing depth to a character whose insatiable lust and violent jealousy typically do not endear him to the audience. This brute has feelings, albeit entirely selfish ones, and Hopkin’s portrayal of the Count makes it easier […]

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“Joshua Hopkins and pianist Myra Huang—brought a combination of impressive technique and emotional passion to every song, many set to poems by Friedrich Ruckert…Hopkins also found a playful undercurrent in Schumann’s setting of the familiar poem Liebst du um Schoenheit (If you love for beauty’s sake). The song’s piano introduction has a jazzy tinge, and […]

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“Joshua Hopkins made a rollicking Saracen Sultan.” The Telegraph, Rupert Christiansen, August 10, 2014. “Joshua Hopkins impressed as Argante, his firm baritone negotiating some fiendish writing, especially in his entrance aria “Sibilar gli angui” whilst able to sing with beauty of tone when required.” Bachtrack, Mark Pullinger, August 10, 2014. “Joshua Hopkins will be familiar […]

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“That performance…was especially notable for the brilliant work of Joshua Hopkins as Papageno. An instantly engaging actor, his natural delivery and comic timing made the hapless bird-catcher more vivid than ever. The baritone’s singing was equally distinguished, rich and even in tone, uncommonly nuanced in dynamics. A class act all the way.” Opera News, Tim […]

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“The versatile Canadian baritone Joshua Hopkins is a standout Schaunard, singing with robust sound and flair.” The New York Times, Anthony Tommasini, January 15, 2014.

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